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Linux Tutorial - Networking - TCP-IP
  Networking ---- IP Addressing  


TCP-IP

Before we talk about the details of networking, we should first talk about the process of network communication. Let's take a network program such as telnet. The telnet program allows you to login to a remote system. You end up with a shell just as if you had logged in locally. Although you are inputting commands on your local keyboard and the output is appearing on your local screen, all other activity is happening on the remote machine.

For simplicity's sake, we can say that there is a telnet program running on each computer. When you are inputting input something on local keyboard, the local copy of telnet is accepting input. It passes the information through the network to the telnet on the remote machine. The command is executed and the output is handed to the remote telnet. That information is passed back through the network to the local telnet, which then displays the information on your screen.

Although it may appear as if there is a constant flow of information between your local machine and the remote one, this is not the case. At any given time there may be dozens, if not hundreds of programs using the network. Since only one can use the network at a time there needs to be a mechanism to allow each program to have its turn.

Think back on our discussion on the kernel. When we need something from the hard disk, the system does not read everything at once. If it did, one process could hog the computer if it needed to read in a large file. Instead, disk requests are send in smaller chunks and the program only thinks that it gets everything it wants. Something similar is done with network connections.

Computers are like humans beings in that they need to speak the same language in order to communicate. Regardless of how they are connected, be it serial or Ethernet, the computers must know how to talk to each other. The communication is carried out in a pre-defined manner, called a "protocol". Like the protocols diplomats and politicians go through, computer protocols determine how each side behaves and how it should react to behavior by its counterpart. Roughly speaking even the interaction between the computer and the hardware, such as the hard disk, can be considered a protocol.

The most common protocol used by UNIX variants, including Linux, is TCP/IP. However, it is more accurate to call TCP/IP a protocol suite, or protocol family. This is because TCP/IP actually consists of several different protocols. Even the name consists of two different protocols as TCP/IP stands for Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol.

TCP/IP is often referred to as protocol suite as it contains many different protocols and therefore many different ways for computers to talk to each other. However, TCP/IP is not the only protocol suite. There are dozens, if not hundreds of different ones, although only a small portion have gained wide acceptance. Linux only uses a few itself, although the TCP/IP family is what is delivered by default and most commonly used.

Although the name refers to two specific protocols, TCP/IP usually refers to an entire suite of protocols and programs. The result of many years of planning and discussion, the TCP/IP suite includes a set of standards which specify how computers ought to communicate. By following these standards, computers "speak" the same language and can therefore communicate. In addition to the actual means of communication that the TCP/IP suite defines conventions for connecting different networks and routing traffic through routers, bridges and other types of connections.

The TCP/IP suite is result of a Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) research project on network connectivity. However, its availability has made it the most commonly installed network software. Many versions provide source-code which reside in the public domain allowing users to adapt it to many new systems. Today, essentially all vendors of network hardware (e.g. bridges, routers) support the TCP/IP suite as it is the standard protocol suite on the Internet and in most companies.

Whereas the data being transferred to and from the hard disk is talked about in terms of blocks, the unit of information transfer across a network connection is referred to as a packet. Depending on the program you are using, this packet can be a different size. In any event they are small enough to send across the network fast enough, so that no one process hog the network. In addition, the packets go across the network so fast that you don't notice that your data is broken in to packets. This is similar to the way the CPU manages processes. Each one gets a very small turn on the processor. Because it switches so fast between processes it only seems like you have the processor to your self.

If we take a step back and look at the process of network communication more abstractly, we see each portion supported by and supporting another. We can say that each portion sits on top of another. Or in other words the protocols are stacked on top of each other. Therefore, TCP/IP is often referred to as a protocol stack. To see how these layers look graphically, take a look at Figure 0-1.

Each portion of the stack is referred to as a layer. At the bottom of the stack is the layer that is responsible for the physical connected between the two computers. This is the physical layer. Sitting on top of the physical layer is the layer that is responsible for the network portion of the stack. That is, it ensures that packets either stay on the network or get to the right network and at the same time ensures that packets get to the right network address. This is the network layer.

On top of the network layer is the layer that ensures that the packets have been transmitted correctly. That is, there are no errors and all packets have been received. This is the transport layer. Finally, at the top of all of this is the layer that the user sees. Since the programs that we use are often called applications, this upper layer is called the application layer.

Image - Network Layers (interactive)

Conceptually, each layer is talking to its counterpart on the other system. That is, telnet on the local machine is passing data to telnet on the remote machine. TCP on the remote machine sends an acknowledgment to TCP on the local machine when it receives a packet. IP on the local machine gets information from IP on the remote machine that tells it that this packet is destined for the local machine. Then there are the network interface cards that communicate with each other using their specific language.

This communication between corresponding layers is all conceptual. The actual communication takes place between the different layers on each machine, not the corresponding layers on both machines.

When the application layer has data to send, but prepends an application header onto the data it needs to send. This header contains information necessary for the application to get the data to the right part of the application on the receiving side. The application then calls up TCP to send the information along. TCP wraps that data into a TCP packet, which contains a TCP header followed by the application data (including header). TCP then hands the packet (also called a TCP segment) to IP. Like the layers before it, IP wraps the packet up and prepends an IP header, to create an IP datagram. Finally, IP hands it off to the hardware driver. If Ethernet, this includes both an Ethernet header and Ethernet trailer. This creates an Ethernet frame. How the encapsulation looks graphically, take a look at Figure 0-2.

As we see, it is the TCP layer that the application talks to. TCP sticks the data from the application into a kind of envelope (the process is called encapsulation) and passes it to the IP layer. Just as the operating system has a mechanism to keep track of which area of memory belongs to what processes, the network has a means of keeping track of what data belongs to what process. This is the job of TCP. It is also the responsibility of TCP to ensure that the packets are delivered with the correct contents and then to put them in the right order. (Encapsulation is show graphically in Figure 0-2.)

Error detection is the job of the TCP envelope which contains a checksum of the data contained within the packet. This checksum information sits in the packet header and is checked on all packets. If the checksum doesn't match the contents of the packet or the packet doesn't arrive at all, it is the job of TCP to ensure that packet is resent. On the sending end, TCP waits for an acknowledgment that each packet has been received. If it hasn't received one within a specific period it will resend that packet. Because of this checksum and the resending of packets, TCP is considered a reliable connection.

Image - Encapsulation of data (interactive)

Another protocol that is often used is the User Datagram Protocol (UDP). Like TCP, UDP sits on top of IP. However, UDP provides a connection-less transport between applications. Services, such as the Network File Service (NFS), that utilize UDP, must provide their own mechanism to ensure delivery and correct sequencing of packets. Since it can be either broadcast or multicast, UDP also offers one-to-many services. Because there is no checking by UDP it is also considered unreliable.

Closest to the hardware level, IP is a protocol that provides the delivery mechanism for the protocols. The IP layer serves the same function as your house addresses, telling the upper layers how to get to where they need to. In fact, the information used by IP to get the pieces of information to their destination are called IP addresses. However, IP does not guarantee that the packets arrive in the right order or that they arrive at all. Just like a letter to your house requires it to be registered in order to ensure that it gets delivered with the content in-tact, IP depends on the upper layers to ensure the integrity and sequencing of the packets. Therefore, IP is considered unreliable.

Since the hardware, that is the network cards do the actual, physical transfer of the packets, it is important that they can be addressed somehow. Each card has its own, unique identifier. This is the Media Access Control, or MAC, address. The MAC address is a 48 bit number that is usually represented by 6 pairs of hexadecimal numbers, separated by (usually) dashes or colons. Each manufacturer of network card is assigned a specific range of addresses which usually are specified by the first three pairs of numbers. Each card has its own, individual address: the MAC address.

When sending a packet, the IP layer has to figure out how to send the packet. If the destination is on a different physical network, then IP needs to send it to the appropriate gateway. However, if the destination machine is on the local network, the IP layers uses the Address Resolution Protocol (ARP) to determine what the MAC address of the Ethernet card is with that IP address.

To figure this out, ARP will broadcast an ARP packet across the entire network asking which MAC address belongs to a particular IP address. Although every machines gets this broadcast, only the one out there that matches will respond. This is then stored by the IP layer in its internal ARP table. You can look at the ARP table at any time by running the command:

This would give you a response similar to:

siemau 194.113.47.147 at 0:0:2:c:8c:d2

This has the general format:

<machine name> (IP address) at <MAC address>

Since the ARP table is cached, IP does not have to send out an ARP request every time it needs to make a connection. Instead, it can quickly look in the ARP table to make the IP-MAC translation. Then, the packet is sent to the appropriate machine.

Status and error information is exchanged between machines through the Internet Control Message Protocol (ICMP). This information can be used by other protocols to recover from transmission problems or by system administrators to detect problems in the network. One of the most commonly used diagnostic tools, "ping", makes use of ICMP.

At the bottom of the pile is the hardware or link layer. As I mentioned before, this can be represented by many different kinds of physical connections: Ethernet, token-ring, fiber-optics, ISDN, RS-232 to name a few.

This four layer model is common when referring to computer networks. This is the model that is most commonly used and the one that I will use through the book. There is another model that consists of seven layers. This is referred to as the OSI model, but we won't be using it here.

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Copyright 2002-2009 by James Mohr. Licensed under modified GNU Free Documentation License (Portions of this material originally published by Prentice Hall, Pearson Education, Inc). See here for details. All rights reserved.
  
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